This collar from Educator is great for dog owners who want an alternative to a traditional shock collar. Rather than using a “sharp” static shock, it relies on “blunt” stimulation technology that has an effect that feels more like a strong tap. Educator describes this as less stressful for dogs, but just as effective for motivating them to comply. It also includes a Pavlovian Tone feature (named for the famed conditioning study), where dogs learn to respond to the sound before the stimulation rather than the stimulation itself.
The following tricks are based on search techniques used in professional dog training organizations. The information is simply to give you a taster and help you to entertain yourself and your dog you will have a lot of fun and enjoy the results of this training. The same command word is fine to be used for all of the search tricks, seek or find are good examples of search commands.

Here’s a good one to round out a demonstration of your dogs’ best tricks: send her to bed for a good rest after all that hard work! “Go to bed” is useful as a cue when your dog needs to be removed from the action and settle down. Of course, you can always take it to the next level by training her to pull the covers over herself…but that one might take a little more time.
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Dog aggression is exhibited by growling, snarling, showing teeth, lunging, and biting. It is important to know that any dog has the potential to show aggression, regardless of breed or history. However, dogs with violent or abusive histories and those bred from dogs with aggressive tendencies are much more likely to exhibit aggressive behavior towards people or other dogs.
As well as obedience training our expert and knowledgeable trainers specialise in addressing a range of behavioural issues. These include aggression, reactivity to dogs, people and traffic, and chasing livestock.Our residential training is an ideal solution, ensuring that the causes of these anti-social and potentially dangerous behaviours are identified and resolved in a safe and effective manner.For more information on our Obedience Training or if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact our friendly team today. dog training collar

Stop them from barking. Excessive barking can be frustrating, especially if the neighbours are threatening to put in a noise complaint. Using a training collar can help to get rid of this habit, as it will activate as soon as barking is detected. For the citronella spray, the release will surprise them into silence, and the release of the odour will be associated with barking. For sound and vibration, it is much the same in that it startles your dog, and the more they bark the long the sound and vibration go on for. 


Stop them from barking. Excessive barking can be frustrating, especially if the neighbours are threatening to put in a noise complaint. Using a training collar can help to get rid of this habit, as it will activate as soon as barking is detected. For the citronella spray, the release will surprise them into silence, and the release of the odour will be associated with barking. For sound and vibration, it is much the same in that it startles your dog, and the more they bark the long the sound and vibration go on for. 
Resource guarding is exhibited by many canines, and is one of the most commonly reported behaviour issues to canine professionals.[50] It is seen when a dog uses specific behaviour patterns so that they can control access to an item, and the patterns are flexible when people are around.[51] If a canine places value on some resource (i.e. food, toys, etc.) they may attempt to guard it from other animals as well as people, which leads to behavioural problems if not treated. The guarding can show in many different ways from rapid ingestion of food to using the body to shield items. It manifests as aggressive behaviour including, but not limited to, growling, barking, or snapping. Some dogs will also resource guard their owners and can become aggressive if the behaviour is allowed to continue. Owners must learn to interpret their dog's body language in order to try to judge the dog's reaction, as visual signals are used (i.e. changes in body posture, facial expression, etc.) to communicate feeling and response.[50] These behaviours are commonly seen in shelter animals, most likely due to insecurities caused by a poor environment. Resource guarding is a concern since it can lead to aggression, but research has found that aggression over guarding can be contained by teaching the dog to drop the item they are guarding.[51] Puppy potty Training
Yes, shock collars do hurt dogs - unlike training collars. A dog may not yelp when they are hurt, but they can still be in pain. Similarly, there may be no signs on their skin that they have been harmed by the electric shock. This is because the damage caused is actually deep in the tissue, and it is left to grow worse the more the shock collar is used. 
Use real rewards Be sure to reward your dog with things she truly finds rewarding. Some dogs will happily work for dry kibble when training in your living room but ignore it if you’re training in the park. Because the park’s a more distracting environment, paying attention there is a harder job for your dog. Pay her accordingly by using a reward worth working for, like small pieces of chicken or cheese, or a chance to run off-leash at the dog park with her buddies. Also keep in mind that what your dog considers rewarding at any given time may change. If she’s just eaten a big meal, a scratch behind the ears or a game of tug might be most rewarding. If she hasn’t eaten in a while, she’ll probably work enthusiastically for tasty treats.
Do your daily walks with your dog tend to feel more like the dog is walking you? Take a different approach when it comes to promoting better leash habits—rather than a typical training collar, go with a simple (but effective) no-pull harness. The idea is pretty straightforward: Simply loop the lead around your dog’s muzzle, and a light tug will remind your dog to not to pull away (or lunge, jump, or otherwise misbehave). There’s no painful pressure to your dog’s throat or head—just a gentle redirection of their attention. go here for more
Mop up any accidents with a paper towel and immediately bring a small piece of the soiled paper, along with your dog, to the potty place. Place the paper towel in the location you would have liked him to go potty and encourage him to sniff it while praising him. If you can, leave the soiled paper behind so that your dog can smell it again the next time you return. click here
Crate training is a great way to start your puppy off on the right paw. Dogs have a natural instinct to keep their den clean, so a properly sized crate, introduced gradually, will create a home base for your puppy and will keep him from having accidents when you can’t watch him. Use the crate when you’re unable to give your puppy your full attention during the day, as well as at nap time and bedtime. Selecting the right size crate is critical, and it should be big enough so that your puppy can comfortably stand up, turn around and lie down but not much bigger. If you opt for a crate that’s too large, your puppy will be able to potty in one corner and sleep comfortably in the other, defeating the purpose of crate training.
Unfortunately, some breeds are labeled "dangerous" and banned in certain areas. However, it's not usually about the breed so much as it's about history. A dog's environment has a major impact on behavior. Also, regardless of breed, a dog may inherit some aggressive traits. Fortunately, most experts agree that breed-specific legislation is not the answer. Puppy potty Training
Step 1: Have your dog lay down. Wait for him to stand up. When he stands up, click and treat. Repeat this action several times until he learns that he has to stand up in order to get his treat. Standing is so natural that it is likely that the dog won't immediately understand why he is being rewarded, so it may take more repetition than usual. (Initially, it's okay to click even if............................................. go here for more
My husband and I used Amazon Basics brand Puppy Pads while potty training our puppy. They are much cheaper than the name brand pads and we found that they actually seem to hold significantly more liquid too. This made our clean up job after work much easier since all we had to do was dispose of the pad (and not have to clean the tile floor beneath it).
The remote will actually let you train two dogs at once thanks to its dual functionality, all you need is an extra collar. There are 100 vibration levels, and you can choose whether to solely use vibration or sound, as well as both. The collar is also a one size fits all, so you shouldn’t have any trouble adjusting it to your dog. Completely waterproof and with rechargeable batteries, it was built to last.  how to potty train a puppy

Unfortunately, some breeds are labeled "dangerous" and banned in certain areas. However, it's not usually about the breed so much as it's about history. A dog's environment has a major impact on behavior. Also, regardless of breed, a dog may inherit some aggressive traits. Fortunately, most experts agree that breed-specific legislation is not the answer. Puppy potty Training


If you run into trouble, go back a few steps If you’re training your dog to do something new and you stop making progress, you may have increased the difficulty of the skill too quickly. Similarly, if you’re practicing a behavior your dog hasn’t performed in a while and she seems a little rusty, she may need some help remembering what you want her to do. If you run into training challenges like these, just refresh your dog’s memory by making the skill a little easier for a few repetitions. Go back to a step that you know your dog can successfully perform, and practice that for a while before trying to increase difficulty again.

While indoor elimination solutions like potty pads and litter boxes have their place, using them can actually slow the process down if you plan to eventually have your dog eliminate exclusively outside. Teaching your puppy to potty inside sometimes and outside others can be confusing because you will eventually have to teach your dog that at some point the indoor option is no longer allowed. Potty pads work best for people who can’t get their puppy outside quickly, like those who live in high-rise apartments or have limited mobility.
The A+ TRAINERROOPZ Dog Training Collar with Remote features beep, vibration and shock discouragements and variable levels within each. With this, you’ll be able to control the intensity (with 7 different levels) to create stronger deterrents if your pup requires them and stick to the minimum if your pup just needs an occasional reminder. The long-lasting battery will keep you from constantly replacing and will allow you to train your pup without worrying about it dying during a critical training exercise.
One of the biggest mistakes new puppy owners make is expecting their puppy to hold it for longer than he is physically capable. The general guideline for puppy “hold times” is that each month of age equates to an hour of “hold time,” so a two-month-old puppy can hold it for roughly two hours. There are exceptions to the rule; your puppy should be able to hold it for slightly longer period of time at night as he gets older and you pup will need potty breaks more frequently when he’s playing. how to potty train a puppy
Success is usually attained in small steps. Training sessions with your dog should last 10 to 15 minutes, two to three times per day. This is especially true for puppies because of their very short attention spans. Longer sessions can cause an adult dog to become bored. Start by teaching basic commands. Try to stick with one action per training session so your dog does not get confused.

Every dog needs to learn to walk on a leash. Besides the fact that most areas have leash laws, there will be times when keeping your dog on a leash is for his own safety. Learn how to introduce your dog or puppy to the leash, then teach him how to walk properly on the leash, even beside you on a bike. A loose leash walk teaches your dog not to pull or lunge when on ​the leash, making the experience more enjoyable for both you and your dog.


Depending on your schedule and your individual dog’s temperament, you may consider using a crate to aid you in potty training your pup. If you’re comfortable using a crate, it may help you keep a better eye on your dog, so you’re better able to recognize his signals that he needs to eliminate. A crate can also teach your pup that he needs to “hold it” until you open the crate and bring him outside.
When dogs are separated from humans, usually the owner, they often display behaviors which can be broken into the following four categories: exploratory behaviour, object play, destructive behaviour, and vocalization, and they are related to the canine's level of arousal.[47] These behaviours may manifest as destructiveness, fecal or urinary elimination, hypersalivation or vocalization among other things. Dogs from single-owner homes are approximately 2.5 times more likely to have separation anxiety compared to dogs from multiple-owner homes. Furthermore, sexually intact dogs are only one third as likely to have separation anxiety as neutered dogs. The sex of dogs and whether there is another pet in the home do not have an effect on separation anxiety.[48] It has been estimated that at least 14% of dogs examined at typical veterinary practices in the United States have shown signs of separation anxiety. Dogs that have been diagnosed with profound separation anxiety can be left alone for no more than minutes before they begin to panic and exhibit the behaviors associated with separation anxiety. Separation problems have been found to be linked to the dog's dependency on its owner, not because of disobedience.[47] In the absence of treatment, affected dogs are often relinquished to a humane society or shelter, abandoned, or euthanized.[49]

Separation anxiety is one of the most commonly discussed dog behavior problems. Manifestations include vocalization, chewing, inappropriate urination and defecation, and other forms of destruction that occur when a dog is separated from his owner. Not all of these actions are the result of separation anxiety. Signs of true separation anxiety include:

Dog aggression is exhibited by growling, snarling, showing teeth, lunging, and biting. It is important to know that any dog has the potential to show aggression, regardless of breed or history. However, dogs with violent or abusive histories and those bred from dogs with aggressive tendencies are much more likely to exhibit aggressive behavior towards people or other dogs. dog training collar

Puppies may nip at you as they learn how to communicate with their pet parents. This usually happens while playing, as young dogs often communicate with their mouths when they interact. It may also happen during training, or for simply no reason you can identify. If your young one is nipping regularly, though, it's important to stop it before it develops into a more problematic dog behavior down the line.
There is only one acceptable methodology for potty training a dog of any age: positive reinforcement. Traditional advice suggested swatting a dog or rubbing his face in his waste for mistakes in the house, but those techniques do nothing to make the potty training process more understandable for your dog and can actually damage your relationship with him. Keep in mind, dogs don’t view their waste the way we do – to them, pee and poo is pretty interesting! Punishing your dog for going in the house won’t help him understand what he should do instead and might make him afraid to go near you at all, inside or out. Successful potty training requires patience, kindness and remembering that your new puppy is just learning the rules.

If your puppy just can’t seem to get the hang of potty training at this point and continuously has accidents in the house, you may consider taking him to a veterinarian to rule out any medical conditions. It’s possible that he has a physical issue that’s impeding his ability to “hold it,” in which case you would want to get him help for the condition as soon as possible.
Shock. Before discarding the idea of a “shock” or “e-collar” right away, please note that these collars aren’t what they used to be. The light shock is not a painful one, just a low enough jolt to surprise and be unpleasant. This is usually the most effective but this is also the one with the most controversy so even knowing it isn’t really hurting your dog, you may opt away from this type.
Above all, keep in mind that every dog is different, and some may take longer to pick up good habits around eliminating than others. Your pup may have perfect manners after just a few days, or he may take a few months to really get the hang of things, especially if he picked up bad habits before joining your family. Remember that patience and persistence are key when it comes to potty training, and that your efforts will be well worth it in the long run. Puppy potty Training

The range on this collar is nearly 800 yards. It’s an appropriate choice for training any dog from 15-120 pounds and puppy to fully-grown dog. The collar is adjustable in length and the unit’s mini-size allows you to use on your dog for extended periods of time without it bothering him. That in itself will go a long way towards training but the ease of use with the remote control will be sure to tip the scales in favor of this collar.


It’s best not to punish the puppy for making a mistake. Instead, focus on praising appropriate bathroom behavior. If you catch your puppy in the act, interrupt it by saying “No!” in a firm voice or clapping your hands loudly, then take the puppy outside to finish going to the bathroom. Never swat your puppy, yell at it, or try to rub its nose in the mess.
Dogs bite and nip for several reasons, most of which are instinctive. Puppies bite and nip to explore the environment. Mother dogs teach their puppies not to bite too hard and discipline them when needed. This helps the puppies develop bite inhibition. Owners often need to show their puppies that mouthing and biting are not acceptable by continuing to teach bite inhibition. more on this
If your dog is house trained, it may come as a surprise if you see him urinating in your home. Dog behavior doesn't usually change without reason. Formerly reliable dogs who suddenly begin urinating inside need your attention! This is a sign that something may be very wrong with your furry friend, and when he relieves himself frequently–even if he is in the correct location–it can be a sign of a urinary tract, bladder, or kidney infection. In an older dog, it may even be a sign of dementia. more on this
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