Domestic dogs appear to pay little attention to relative size, despite the large weight differences between the largest and smallest individuals; for example, size was not a predictor of the outcome of encounters between dogs meeting while being exercised by their owners nor was size correlated with neutered male dogs.[36] Therefore, many dogs do not appear to pay much attention to the actual fighting ability of their opponent, presumably allowing differences in motivation (how much the dog values the resource) and perceived motivation (what the behavior of the other dog signifies about the likelihood that it will escalate) to play a much greater role.[34] dog training classes

In 2012, a study found that dogs oriented toward their owner or a stranger more often when the person was pretending to cry than when they were talking or humming. When the stranger pretended to cry, rather than approaching their usual source of comfort, their owner, dogs sniffed, nuzzled and licked the stranger instead. The dogs' pattern of response was behaviorally consistent with an expression of empathic concern.[16] more on this

Your pup's actions tell you a lot about his mood. And although you may not be fluent in the canine tongue–short of what it means when it salivates–you do need to learn how to interpret dog behavior. Have you ever witnessed your dog licking certain textures or circling the same spot in front of you? There are many reasons a specific dog state of mind or health concern may cause him to do these things. Once you pay attention to his behavior, you'll be able to help him.
When dogs are separated from humans, usually the owner, they often display behaviors which can be broken into the following four categories: exploratory behaviour, object play, destructive behaviour, and vocalization, and they are related to the canine's level of arousal.[47] These behaviours may manifest as destructiveness, fecal or urinary elimination, hypersalivation or vocalization among other things. Dogs from single-owner homes are approximately 2.5 times more likely to have separation anxiety compared to dogs from multiple-owner homes. Furthermore, sexually intact dogs are only one third as likely to have separation anxiety as neutered dogs. The sex of dogs and whether there is another pet in the home do not have an effect on separation anxiety.[48] It has been estimated that at least 14% of dogs examined at typical veterinary practices in the United States have shown signs of separation anxiety. Dogs that have been diagnosed with profound separation anxiety can be left alone for no more than minutes before they begin to panic and exhibit the behaviors associated with separation anxiety. Separation problems have been found to be linked to the dog's dependency on its owner, not because of disobedience.[47] In the absence of treatment, affected dogs are often relinquished to a humane society or shelter, abandoned, or euthanized.[49]

When using a crate, make sure that it is large enough to let your pup stand, turn around, and lie down comfortably. However, it should not be so large that your puppy could use a corner of the crate as an elimination spot. If your dog does start eliminating in the crate, you should stop using this method. Your puppy may have picked up this bad habit in a previous home, or he may be too young to deal with a crate. Dog Training


The “shock factor” of many training collars doesn't appeal to everyone. That’s understandable—and there are other options for pet owners who want to promote better behavior, but are worried about causing their dog pain. This collar from Wolfwill exclusively uses tones and vibration to give your dog feedback and is still highly effective. The vibration feature has 16 levels of intensity, and the collar works at a range of up to 660 yards. The transmitter is designed with touch-distinguished buttons made with blind users in mind, but the product isn’t specific to owners of seeing-eye dogs.
Step 1: Have your dog lay down. Wait for him to stand up. When he stands up, click and treat. Repeat this action several times until he learns that he has to stand up in order to get his treat. Standing is so natural that it is likely that the dog won't immediately understand why he is being rewarded, so it may take more repetition than usual. (Initially, it's okay to click even if.............................................
Step 1: Set up obstacles, such as orange cones (bought at Wal-mart), buckets, or even red plastic cups in a straight line. Start with three or four, and space them 24-30 inches apart. With your touch stick, guide your dog in and out of the obstacles, starting from the left side. When he goes in and out of one or two, click and treat. Continue to do this until he goes in and out of all of them.
If your puppy just can’t seem to get the hang of potty training at this point and continuously has accidents in the house, you may consider taking him to a veterinarian to rule out any medical conditions. It’s possible that he has a physical issue that’s impeding his ability to “hold it,” in which case you would want to get him help for the condition as soon as possible.
The range on this collar is nearly 800 yards. It’s an appropriate choice for training any dog from 15-120 pounds and puppy to fully-grown dog. The collar is adjustable in length and the unit’s mini-size allows you to use on your dog for extended periods of time without it bothering him. That in itself will go a long way towards training but the ease of use with the remote control will be sure to tip the scales in favor of this collar.
One of the biggest predictors of a speedy potty training process is owner diligence. If you’re on top of your puppy’s schedule and you stick to a strict prevention and supervision regiment, you should be well on your way to potty training success within a few months. You can consider your puppy almost fully housetrained when you’ve gone an entire month without a single accident, but keep in mind that potty training is an inexact science. It’s best to have several dry months before you can really trust that your puppy understands the rules.

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Separation anxiety is one of the most commonly discussed dog behavior problems. Manifestations include vocalization, chewing, inappropriate urination and defecation, and other forms of destruction that occur when a dog is separated from his owner. Not all of these actions are the result of separation anxiety. Signs of true separation anxiety include:
Remember that training is an ongoing process. You will never be completely finished. It is important to keep working on obedience training throughout the life of your dog. People who learn a language at a young age but stop speaking that language may forget much of it as they grow older. The same goes for your dog: use it or lose it. Running through even the most basic tricks and commands will help them stay fresh in your dog's mind. Plus, it's a great way to spend time with your dog. dog training collar
If you ask around, you’ll get all kinds of advice about training your dog. Some people will tell you that the key is to use a “firm hand”-to make sure your dog doesn’t think she can get away with naughty behavior. Some people argue that you should only use rewards in dog training and avoid punishing your dog in any way. Some people insist that all you have to do is “be the alpha dog,” assert your status as the dominant leader of your “pack.” It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the glut of differing opinions out there.
The oldest form is a “shock” collar, but a lot has changed since then; they’re no longer painful and inhumane; even the Humane society supports its use (for modern collars, that is). There are other forms of stimulus that will deter dogs, too, though. You can try a collar that spurts an unpleasant smell (usually citronella as dog’s don’t care for that) when your dog is misbehaving. Other stimuli include loud sounds, ultra-sonic sounds, lights, and vibrations.

The term personality has been applied to human research, whereas the term temperament has been mostly used for animal research.[18] However, both terms have been used interchangeably in the literature, or purely to distinguish humans from animals and avoid anthropomorphism.[19] Personality can be defined as “a set of behaviors that are consistent over context and time”.[20] Studies of dogs' personalities have tried to identify the presence of broad personality traits that are stable and consistent over time.[19][20][21][22]


One of the biggest predictors of a speedy potty training process is owner diligence. If you’re on top of your puppy’s schedule and you stick to a strict prevention and supervision regiment, you should be well on your way to potty training success within a few months. You can consider your puppy almost fully housetrained when you’ve gone an entire month without a single accident, but keep in mind that potty training is an inexact science. It’s best to have several dry months before you can really trust that your puppy understands the rules.
When teaching new skills, keep training sessions short and sweet Like kids, dogs don’t have long attention spans. There’s no hard-and-fast rule, but an ideal average training session should last 15 minutes or less. Within that session, you can work on one skill or switch between a few different skills. To keep things interesting, try doing 5 to 15 repetitions of one behavior and then doing 5 to 15 repetitions of another behavior. You can also practice new skills and keep old ones polished by doing single repetitions at convenient times throughout the day. For example, before giving your dog a tasty new chew bone, ask her to sit or lie down to earn it.
Now that you’ve established a routine around bathroom breaks, you can start to increase the time between your puppy’s outdoor visits. A good general rule of thumb to determine how often your dog needs to go outside is that a puppy can “hold it” for about as many hours as he is months old, plus one. That means, for example, that if your dog is three months old, he should be able to “hold it” for up to four hours. Remember, though, that he will still need a potty break shortly after his meals as well as first thing in the morning.
Above all, keep in mind that every dog is different, and some may take longer to pick up good habits around eliminating than others. Your pup may have perfect manners after just a few days, or he may take a few months to really get the hang of things, especially if he picked up bad habits before joining your family. Remember that patience and persistence are key when it comes to potty training, and that your efforts will be well worth it in the long run. 

If your puppy is only a few months old, he should also be taken out every hour or so during the day, including after his meals and, ideally, when he wakes up from a nap. It’s also a good idea to take your pup outside after he’s been playing or after he has finished chewing on a toy or bone. Keep in mind that puppies tend to defecate more than adult dogs—-up to five times a day is normal.
The oldest form is a “shock” collar, but a lot has changed since then; they’re no longer painful and inhumane; even the Humane society supports its use (for modern collars, that is). There are other forms of stimulus that will deter dogs, too, though. You can try a collar that spurts an unpleasant smell (usually citronella as dog’s don’t care for that) when your dog is misbehaving. Other stimuli include loud sounds, ultra-sonic sounds, lights, and vibrations.
Do not scold your dog harshly if you catch him urinating in the wrong place. Calmly say, "No," and bring him to his potty place with a piece of soiled paper towel. Only scold your dog for going in the wrong place if you catch her in the act. Do not drag her back to a puddle to scold her. She will not understand that it is the location of the urine that is the problem and may even begin to fear urinating in front of you. Puppy potty Training
Taking the learning from Stages 1 and 2, we now test the dog within a public environment with real life distractions. This period can be the most challenging for the dog. Using a range of public locations we train the dog to utilise learned behaviours.During Stage 3 we expect the dog to work on verbal commands only, asking for a higher level of obedience. The training is still fun. At this stage, we have usually exchanged the food reward for a toy.
Develop a potty procedure before you start training, and then stick to it. Decide in advance where you want your dog to go potty and which cues you will give her to indicate that it is time. For example, if you plan to train your dog to go potty outside, then start training directly outdoors. Beginning with newspaper or a litter box will only confuse her and extend the training process. dog training collar
When using a crate, make sure that it is large enough to let your pup stand, turn around, and lie down comfortably. However, it should not be so large that your puppy could use a corner of the crate as an elimination spot. If your dog does start eliminating in the crate, you should stop using this method. Your puppy may have picked up this bad habit in a previous home, or he may be too young to deal with a crate. Dog Training
Approach accidents in the right way. When this happens, do not punish your pup. Instead, when you catch him eliminating in the house, clap loudly to let him know he’s done something inappropriate. Then, immediately take him outside by calling his name or leading him gently by the collar. When he finishes eliminating outside, respond by giving him praise and/or a small treat to reinforce the behavior. more
Space used by feral dogs is not dissimilar from most other canids in that they use defined traditional areas (home ranges) that tend to be defended against intruders, and have core areas where most of their activities are undertaken. Urban domestic dogs have a home range of 2-61 hectares in contrast to a feral dogs home range of 58 square kilometers. Wolf home ranges vary from 78 square kilometers where prey is deer to 2.5 square kilometers at higher latitudes where prey is moose and caribou. Wolves will defend their territory based on prey abundance and pack density, but feral dogs will defend their home ranges all year. Where wolf ranges and feral dog ranges overlap, the feral dogs will site their core areas closer to human settlement.[38] Dog Training
Two dogs that are contesting possession of a highly valued resource for the first time, if one is in a state of emotional arousal, in pain; if reactivity is influenced by recent endocrine changes, or motivational states such as hunger, then the outcome of the interaction may be different than if none of these factors were present. Equally, the threshold at which aggression is shown may be influenced by a range of medical factors, or, in some cases, precipitated entirely by pathological disorders. Hence, the contextual and physiological factors present when two dogs first encounter each other may profoundly influence the long-term nature of the relationship between those dogs. The complexity of the factors involved in this type of learning means that dogs may develop different "expectations" about the likely response of another individual for each resource in a range of different situations. Puppies learn early not to challenge an older dog and this respect stays with them into adulthood. When adult animals meet for the first time, they have no expectations of the behavior of the other: they will both, therefore, be initially anxious and vigilant in this encounter (characterized by the tense body posture and sudden movements typically seen when two dogs first meet), until they start to be able to predict the responses of the other individual. The outcome of these early adult–adult interactions will be influenced by the specific factors present at the time of the initial encounters. As well as contextual and physiological factors, the previous experiences of each member of the dyad of other dogs will also influence their behavior.[34] dog training classes
Inappropriate urination and defecation are among the most frustrating dog behaviors. They can damage areas of your home and make your dog unwelcome in public places or at the homes of others. It is most important that you discuss this behavior with your veterinarian first to rule out health problems. If no medical cause is found, try to determine the reason for the behavior, which can come down to one of the following:
Scent. There are several scents that are displeasing to your dog and emitting those smells into the air near his face will go a long way to deterring him from bad behaviors. The smells are typically citronella or mint so keep in mind that if you’re also not a fan, the smell may just bother you a bit, too. This isn’t the most common collar and it can be hard to find, but if your dog is particularly sensitive to smells, this may be the best bet for you.

From a young age, dogs engage in play with one another. Dog play is made up primarily of mock fights. It is believed that this behavior, which is most common in puppies, is training for important behaviors later in life. Play between puppies is not necessarily a 50:50 symmetry of dominant and submissive roles between the individuals; dogs who engage in greater rates of dominant behaviors (e.g. chasing, forcing partners down) at later ages also initiate play at higher rates. This could imply that winning during play becomes more important as puppies mature.[11] Puppy Training

From a young age, dogs engage in play with one another. Dog play is made up primarily of mock fights. It is believed that this behavior, which is most common in puppies, is training for important behaviors later in life. Play between puppies is not necessarily a 50:50 symmetry of dominant and submissive roles between the individuals; dogs who engage in greater rates of dominant behaviors (e.g. chasing, forcing partners down) at later ages also initiate play at higher rates. This could imply that winning during play becomes more important as puppies mature.[11] dog training tips

The PetSafe Gentle Lead Head Collar is available in sizes suitable for dogs from five pounds to over 130 and comes in eight different colors. The package also includes an explainer DVD that demonstrates the appropriate way to use the collar. Customers rave that it really does help dogs that won’t quit pulling on the leash—and it won’t break the budget, either.

Domestic dogs appear to pay little attention to relative size, despite the large weight differences between the largest and smallest individuals; for example, size was not a predictor of the outcome of encounters between dogs meeting while being exercised by their owners nor was size correlated with neutered male dogs.[36] Therefore, many dogs do not appear to pay much attention to the actual fighting ability of their opponent, presumably allowing differences in motivation (how much the dog values the resource) and perceived motivation (what the behavior of the other dog signifies about the likelihood that it will escalate) to play a much greater role.[34] dog training classes


Puppy pads give your dog the option to relieve himself in an approved spot within the house. Training your dog to use a puppy pad is similar to training him to eliminate outside. If your dog signals that he has to potty or starts to go potty in another area, immediately lead him to the puppy pad. Once he’s successfully used the puppy pad, make sure to reinforce the behavior with praise and/or treats.
Work on only one part of a skill at a time Many of the skills we want our dogs to learn are complex. For instance, if you want to train a solid sit-stay, you’ll need to work on teaching your dog that she should stay in a sitting position until you release her (duration), she should stay while you move away from her (distance), and she should stay while distracting things are going on around her (distraction). You’ll probably both get frustrated if you try to teach her all of these things at the same time. Instead, start with just one part of the skill and, when your dog has mastered that, add another part. For example, you can work on duration first. When your dog can sit-stay for a few minutes in a quiet place with no distractions while you stand right next to her, start training her to stay while you move away from her. While you focus on that new part of the skill, go back to asking your dog to stay for just a few seconds again. When your dog can stay while you move around the room, slowly build up the duration of the stay again. Then you can add the next part-training in a more distracting environment. Again, when you make the skill harder by adding distraction, make the other parts-duration and distance-easier for a little while. If you work on all the parts of a complex skill separately before putting them together, you’ll set your dog up to succeed. 

Yes – with a warning. Most bark collars respond to a bark with a negative stimulus: citronella spray, ultrasonic sound, or a brief shock. The problem, and the warning, is for homes with multiple dogs or even dogs nearby. For this reason, many bark collars come with adjustable levels of sensitivity, making it harder to set off or easier, depending on your specific situation. You don’t want your dog getting negative reinforcement when another dog is misbehaving; of course because it’s cruel but also because it will confuse him and make the collar worthless. So use these collars carefully and never when he’s in the company of other untrained dogs.
The Pet Resolve Dog Training Collar with Remote has both shock and vibration to deter your pup from his bad behavior and for emergencies, you can hold the button down for prolonged vibration or shock for up to 8 seconds. This will help you get him out of trouble before he gets himself hurt or hurts someone else. (Imagine if your pup is especially curious about your chicken coop.)
Dogs (and wolves) mark their territories with urine and their stools.[37] The anal gland of canines give a particular signature to fecal deposits and identifies the marker as well as the place where the dung is left. Dogs are very particular about these landmarks, and engage in what is to humans a meaningless and complex ritual before defecating. Most dogs start with a careful bout of sniffing of a location, perhaps to erect an exact line or boundary between their territory and another dog's territory. This behavior may also involve a small degree of elevation, such as a rock or fallen branch, to aid scent dispersal. Scratching the ground after defecating is a visual sign pointing to the scent marking. The freshness of the scent gives visitors some idea of the current status of a piece of territory and if it is used frequently. Regions under dispute, or used by different animals at different times, may lead to marking battles with every scent marked-over by a new competitor.[6]:252–4 more on this
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