All of the wild members of the genus Canis display complex coordinated parental behaviors. Wolf pups are cared for primarily by their mother for the first 3 months of their life when she remains in the den with them while they rely on her milk for sustenance and her presence for protection. The father brings her food. Once they leave the den and can chew, the parents and pups from previous years regurgitate food for them. Wolf pups become independent by 5 to 8 months, although they often stay with their parents for years. In contrast, dog pups are cared for by the mother and rely on her for milk and protection but she gets no help from the father nor other dogs. Once pups are weaned around 10 weeks they are independent and receive no further maternal care.[45]


Despite claims in the popular press, studies could not find evidence of a single predation on cattle by feral dogs.[38][80][81] However, domestic dogs were responsible for the death of 3 calves over one 5-year study.[81] Other studies in Europe and North America indicate only limited success in the consumption of wild boar, deer and other ungulates, however it could not be determined if this was predation or scavenging on carcasses. Studies have observed feral dogs conducting brief, uncoordinated chases of small game with constant barking - a technique without success.[38]

Space used by feral dogs is not dissimilar from most other canids in that they use defined traditional areas (home ranges) that tend to be defended against intruders, and have core areas where most of their activities are undertaken. Urban domestic dogs have a home range of 2-61 hectares in contrast to a feral dogs home range of 58 square kilometers. Wolf home ranges vary from 78 square kilometers where prey is deer to 2.5 square kilometers at higher latitudes where prey is moose and caribou. Wolves will defend their territory based on prey abundance and pack density, but feral dogs will defend their home ranges all year. Where wolf ranges and feral dog ranges overlap, the feral dogs will site their core areas closer to human settlement.[38] dog training collar
The A+ TRAINERROOPZ Dog Training Collar with Remote features beep, vibration and shock discouragements and variable levels within each. With this, you’ll be able to control the intensity (with 7 different levels) to create stronger deterrents if your pup requires them and stick to the minimum if your pup just needs an occasional reminder. The long-lasting battery will keep you from constantly replacing and will allow you to train your pup without worrying about it dying during a critical training exercise.

Martingale collars are the humane successor to the choke chains of old. They operate in a similar fashion, with the collar tightening when your dog starts to pull. But because of the limited closure, it’s much safer and won’t actually choke your dog—just adjust to the size of their neck. For that reason, it’s also a great choice for pet owners whose dogs have a habit of slipping out of their leash.
The range on this collar is nearly 800 yards. It’s an appropriate choice for training any dog from 15-120 pounds and puppy to fully-grown dog. The collar is adjustable in length and the unit’s mini-size allows you to use on your dog for extended periods of time without it bothering him. That in itself will go a long way towards training but the ease of use with the remote control will be sure to tip the scales in favor of this collar.
Containing your pet. If you want to create a virtual fence in your garden, this is one of the best ways to do so. Every time they reach the border, you get the collar to vibrate or make a sound. This will alert the dog, and over time they will learn to stay away from the invisible line. This is an especially handy benefit if you have no fence and are not allowed to construct one.
Now that you’ve established a routine around bathroom breaks, you can start to increase the time between your puppy’s outdoor visits. A good general rule of thumb to determine how often your dog needs to go outside is that a puppy can “hold it” for about as many hours as he is months old, plus one. That means, for example, that if your dog is three months old, he should be able to “hold it” for up to four hours. Remember, though, that he will still need a potty break shortly after his meals as well as first thing in the morning.

You should not use a shock collar on a dog at any age, but a training collar that uses vibration, sound, or a spray can be used from six months of age. It should be noted that while this is the minimum age, many experts believe that waiting until your pup is around eight months old is much more sensible. This is because puppy skin is more sensitive to things like vibrations, and their senses are still fully developing.

Despite claims that dogs show more human-like social cognition than wolves,[65][66][67] several recent studies have demonstrated that if wolves are properly socialized to humans and have the opportunity to interact with humans regularly, then they too can succeed on some human-guided cognitive tasks,[68][69][70][71][72] in some cases out-performing dogs at an individual level.[73] Similar to dogs, wolves can also follow more complex point types made with body parts other than the human arm and hand (e.g. elbow, knee, foot).[72] Both dogs and wolves have the cognitive capacity for prosocial behavior toward humans; however it is not guaranteed. For canids to perform well on traditional human-guided tasks (e.g. following the human point) both relevant lifetime experiences with humans - including socialization to humans during the critical period for social development - and opportunities to associate human body parts with certain outcomes (such as food being provided by human hands, a human throwing or kicking a ball, etc.) are required.[74]
This article was co-authored by David Levin. David Levin is the Owner of Citizen Hound, a professional dog walking business based in the San Francisco Bay Area. With over 9 years of professional dog walking and training experience, David's business has been voted the "Best Dog Walker SF" by Beast of the Bay for 2019, 2018, and 2017. Citizen Hound has also been ranked #1 Dog Walker by the SF Examiner and A-List in 2017, 2016, 2015. Citizen Hound prides themselves on their customer service, care, skill, and reputation. dog training tips
One of the biggest predictors of a speedy potty training process is owner diligence. If you’re on top of your puppy’s schedule and you stick to a strict prevention and supervision regiment, you should be well on your way to potty training success within a few months. You can consider your puppy almost fully housetrained when you’ve gone an entire month without a single accident, but keep in mind that potty training is an inexact science. It’s best to have several dry months before you can really trust that your puppy understands the rules.
I like to help Dog Parents find unique ways to do things that will save time & money — so I write about “outside the box” Dog Tips and Dog Hacks that most wouldn’t think of. I’m a lifelong dog owner — currently have 2 mixed breed Golden Aussies that we found abandoned on the side of the road as puppies. I’ve always trained my own dogs and help friends train theirs, as well. Professionally, I worked at a vet and have several friends who are veterinarians — whom I consult with regularly. (And just because I love animals so much, I also worked at a Zoo for awhile!) I’ve been sharing my best ideas with others by blogging full-time since 1998 (the same year that Google started… and before the days of Facebook and YouTube). My daily motivation is to help first-time dog owners be better prepared from the first day your new puppy enters your home. I like to help dog owners understand what’s ‘normal’ and what you can expect in terms of living with and training your dog — how to get through the ups & downs of potty training, chewing, teaching commands, getting your dog to listen, and everything else that takes place during that hectic first year! When I’m not training, walking, grooming, or making homemade treats for my dogs, you will find me at the corner of Good News & Fun Times as publisher of The Fun Times Guide (32 fun & helpful websites). To date, I’ve written over 500 articles for dog owners on this site! Many of them have upwards of 200K shares. Dog Training
Jenny is a frequent contributing author for Pup Life Today. She’s originally from Central Ohio but has lived all over the world with her family, including Texas, Florida and Germany, among other places. She’s taken her two fur babies (and human ones, too) with her along the way and currently calls Eastern PA home. Jenny has been writing on all things pets (mostly focused on dogs) since 2015 and hopes to continue honing her expertise for many years to come.
Positive reinforcement is the key to success. A common mistake is to punish your dog during training or become angry. This will only cause confusion. You can try to hold your dog's attention with treats and enthusiasm, but know that it is time to end a session when your dog becomes bored or tired. Try to end sessions on a positive note. Eventually, successful training will be achieved with patience and consistency.
Resource guarding is exhibited by many canines, and is one of the most commonly reported behaviour issues to canine professionals.[50] It is seen when a dog uses specific behaviour patterns so that they can control access to an item, and the patterns are flexible when people are around.[51] If a canine places value on some resource (i.e. food, toys, etc.) they may attempt to guard it from other animals as well as people, which leads to behavioural problems if not treated. The guarding can show in many different ways from rapid ingestion of food to using the body to shield items. It manifests as aggressive behaviour including, but not limited to, growling, barking, or snapping. Some dogs will also resource guard their owners and can become aggressive if the behaviour is allowed to continue. Owners must learn to interpret their dog's body language in order to try to judge the dog's reaction, as visual signals are used (i.e. changes in body posture, facial expression, etc.) to communicate feeling and response.[50] These behaviours are commonly seen in shelter animals, most likely due to insecurities caused by a poor environment. Resource guarding is a concern since it can lead to aggression, but research has found that aggression over guarding can be contained by teaching the dog to drop the item they are guarding.[51] go here for more
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