Domestic dogs are polygamous in contrast to wolves that are generally monogamous. Therefore, domestic dogs have no pair bonding and the protection of a single mate, but rather have multiple mates in a year. There is no paternal care in dogs as opposed to wolves where all pack members assist the mother with the pups. The consequence is that wolves put a lot of energy into producing a few pups in contrast to dogs that maximize the production of pups. This higher pup production rate enables dogs to maintain or even increase their population with a lower pup survival rate than wolves, and allows dogs a greater capacity than wolves to grow their population after a population crash or when entering a new habitat. It is proposed that these differences are an alternative breeding strategy adapted to a life of scavenging instead of hunting.[45] In contrast to domestic dogs, feral dogs are monogamous. Domestic dogs tend to have a litter size of 10, wolves 3, and feral dogs 5–8. Feral pups have a very high mortality rate with only 5% surviving at the age of one year, and sometimes the pups are left unattended making them vulnerable to predators.[38] Domestic dogs stand alone among all canids for a total lack of paternal care.[77]
To get you started on the dos and don’ts, must haves and don’t wants we’ve organized a list to start you off right. We reviewed dozens of training collars for dogs to identify the best of the best. We looked at those with remotes and those without, along with those with and without an electric shock. We gathered our research and narrowed it down for you.
Practice everywhere, with everyone If you learn that two plus two equals four in a classroom, you’ll take that information with you wherever you go. Dogs, however, learn very specifically and don’t automatically apply their knowledge in different situations and places as well as people do. If you teach your dog to sit on cue in your kitchen, you’ll have a beautifully kitchen-trained dog. But she might not understand what you mean when you ask her to sit in other locations. If you want your dog to perform new skills everywhere, you’ll need to practice them in multiple places-your home, your yard, out on walks, at friends’ houses, at the park and anywhere else you take your dog.
The following tricks are based on search techniques used in professional dog training organizations. The information is simply to give you a taster and help you to entertain yourself and your dog you will have a lot of fun and enjoy the results of this training. The same command word is fine to be used for all of the search tricks, seek or find are good examples of search commands. dog training tips
Scent. There are several scents that are displeasing to your dog and emitting those smells into the air near his face will go a long way to deterring him from bad behaviors. The smells are typically citronella or mint so keep in mind that if you’re also not a fan, the smell may just bother you a bit, too. This isn’t the most common collar and it can be hard to find, but if your dog is particularly sensitive to smells, this may be the best bet for you.
This is one of the cheapest training collars you will find, which makes it perfect if you are on a budget and looking to save money. While the absence of the power switch can be irksome, the recharge time is not particularly long so you don’t need to wait for ages to be able to use it again. Using safe and cruelty-free methods, this is a fantastic choice if you are looking to stop excessive barking in your dog. how to potty train a puppy

Improve their training. More specifically, this tends to refer to off the lead training, where the dog is running loose and you use the training collar to help correct misbehaviours. This could be used for things like food aggression, or aggression towards other dogs but in a controlled environment. It may also teach them to stay away from things that could hurt them, like busy roads near unsecured dog walking areas, as well as cycle paths. It can be a good aide to general training, but only in a few situations. 

While indoor elimination solutions like potty pads and litter boxes have their place, using them can actually slow the process down if you plan to eventually have your dog eliminate exclusively outside. Teaching your puppy to potty inside sometimes and outside others can be confusing because you will eventually have to teach your dog that at some point the indoor option is no longer allowed. Potty pads work best for people who can’t get their puppy outside quickly, like those who live in high-rise apartments or have limited mobility.
If your puppy is only a few months old, he should also be taken out every hour or so during the day, including after his meals and, ideally, when he wakes up from a nap. It’s also a good idea to take your pup outside after he’s been playing or after he has finished chewing on a toy or bone. Keep in mind that puppies tend to defecate more than adult dogs—-up to five times a day is normal. how to potty train a puppy
The amount of time it takes to teach a dog varies greatly from dog to dog, and potty training is no exception. Some dogs need to hear a command repeated 100 times before they really understand what you saying; others can begin to grasp it in under 10 repetitions. How you deliver the command can have an enormous impact on the length of time it takes your dog to catch on. The more frequent and consistent your commands, the quicker your dog will put two and two together.
To get you started on the dos and don’ts, must haves and don’t wants we’ve organized a list to start you off right. We reviewed dozens of training collars for dogs to identify the best of the best. We looked at those with remotes and those without, along with those with and without an electric shock. We gathered our research and narrowed it down for you. click here

The motivation for a dog to play with another dog is distinct from that of a dog playing with a human. Dogs walked together with opportunities to play with one another, play with their owners with the same frequency as dogs being walked alone. Dogs in households with two or more dogs play more often with their owners than dogs in households with a single dog, indicating the motivation to play with other dogs does not substitute for the motivation to play with humans.[13]
Comparisons made within the wolf-like canids allow the identification of those behaviors that may have been inherited from common ancestry and those that may have been the result of domestication or other relatively recent environmental changes.[38] Studies of free-ranging African Basenjis and New Guinea Singing Dogs indicate that their behavioral and ecological traits were the result of environmental selection pressures or selective breeding choices and not the result of artificial selection imposed by humans.[54]
The motivation for a dog to play with another dog is distinct from that of a dog playing with a human. Dogs walked together with opportunities to play with one another, play with their owners with the same frequency as dogs being walked alone. Dogs in households with two or more dogs play more often with their owners than dogs in households with a single dog, indicating the motivation to play with other dogs does not substitute for the motivation to play with humans.[13]
Keep in mind that ditching the “alpha dog” concept doesn’t mean you have to let your dog do anything she likes. It’s fine to be the boss and make the rules-but you can do that without unnecessary conflict. Be a benevolent boss, not a bully. Good leadership isn’t about dominance and power struggles. It’s about controlling your dog’s behavior by controlling her access to things she wants. YOU have the opposable thumbs that open cans of dog food, turn doorknobs and throw tennis balls! Use them to your best advantage. If your dog wants to go out, ask her to sit before you open the door. When she wants dinner, ask her to lie down to earn it. Does she want to go for a walk? If she’s jumping up on you with excitement, wait calmly until she sits. Then clip on the leash and take your walk. Your dog will happily work for everything she loves in life. She can learn to do what you want in order to earn what she wants.

The PetSafe Gentle Lead Head Collar is available in sizes suitable for dogs from five pounds to over 130 and comes in eight different colors. The package also includes an explainer DVD that demonstrates the appropriate way to use the collar. Customers rave that it really does help dogs that won’t quit pulling on the leash—and it won’t break the budget, either.
Domestic dogs appear to pay little attention to relative size, despite the large weight differences between the largest and smallest individuals; for example, size was not a predictor of the outcome of encounters between dogs meeting while being exercised by their owners nor was size correlated with neutered male dogs.[36] Therefore, many dogs do not appear to pay much attention to the actual fighting ability of their opponent, presumably allowing differences in motivation (how much the dog values the resource) and perceived motivation (what the behavior of the other dog signifies about the likelihood that it will escalate) to play a much greater role.[34] click here
Taking the learning from Stages 1 and 2, we now test the dog within a public environment with real life distractions. This period can be the most challenging for the dog. Using a range of public locations we train the dog to utilise learned behaviours.During Stage 3 we expect the dog to work on verbal commands only, asking for a higher level of obedience. The training is still fun. At this stage, we have usually exchanged the food reward for a toy.

Dogs thrive on a predictable schedule, and setting one up for your new puppy will make life easier for both of you. Feed your puppy at the same times each day to help you predict and schedule bathroom breaks. Schedule post-meal walks, as well as hourly trips outside during the initial stages of potty training. Always take your puppy out after crating, even if was only for a short time, and remember that vigorous play should always be interrupted for potty breaks.


A study using dogs that were trained to remain motionless while unsedated and unrestrained in an MRI scanner exhibited caudate activation to a hand signal associated with reward.[2] Further work found that the magnitude of the canine caudate response is similar to that of humans, while the between-subject variability in dogs may be less than humans.[92] In a further study, 5 scents were presented (self, familiar human, strange human, familiar dog, strange dog). While the olfactory bulb/peduncle was activated to a similar degree by all the scents, the caudate was activated maximally to the familiar human. Importantly, the scent of the familiar human was not the handler, meaning that the caudate response differentiated the scent in the absence of the person being present. The caudate activation suggested that not only did the dogs discriminate that scent from the others, they had a positive association with it. Although these signals came from two different people, the humans lived in the same household as the dog and therefore represented the dog's primary social circle. And while dogs should be highly tuned to the smell of items that are not comparable, it seems that the “reward response” is reserved for their humans.[93]

Yes, a training collar is completely safe for your dog. This is because they only use sound, vibration, or citronella spray. Each of these is completely harmless and designed to give your dog a surprise as opposed to an electric shock. They are effective for training, and they will not cause increased aggression because your dog is not feeling any pain, they are just a little startled by the sudden sound, sensation, or smell. 


Resource guarding is exhibited by many canines, and is one of the most commonly reported behaviour issues to canine professionals.[50] It is seen when a dog uses specific behaviour patterns so that they can control access to an item, and the patterns are flexible when people are around.[51] If a canine places value on some resource (i.e. food, toys, etc.) they may attempt to guard it from other animals as well as people, which leads to behavioural problems if not treated. The guarding can show in many different ways from rapid ingestion of food to using the body to shield items. It manifests as aggressive behaviour including, but not limited to, growling, barking, or snapping. Some dogs will also resource guard their owners and can become aggressive if the behaviour is allowed to continue. Owners must learn to interpret their dog's body language in order to try to judge the dog's reaction, as visual signals are used (i.e. changes in body posture, facial expression, etc.) to communicate feeling and response.[50] These behaviours are commonly seen in shelter animals, most likely due to insecurities caused by a poor environment. Resource guarding is a concern since it can lead to aggression, but research has found that aggression over guarding can be contained by teaching the dog to drop the item they are guarding.[51] Puppy potty Training
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