Depending on your schedule and your individual dog’s temperament, you may consider using a crate to aid you in potty training your pup. If you’re comfortable using a crate, it may help you keep a better eye on your dog, so you’re better able to recognize his signals that he needs to eliminate. A crate can also teach your pup that he needs to “hold it” until you open the crate and bring him outside.

It’s easy to reward good behavior if you focus on teaching your dog to do specific things you like. Dogs can learn an impressive array of obedience skills and entertaining tricks. Deciding what you’d like your dog to learn will depend on your interests and lifestyle. If you want your dog to behave politely, you can focus on skills like sit, down, wait at doors, leave it, come when called and stay. If you want to enhance your enjoyment of outings with your dog, you can train her to walk politely on leash, without pulling. If you have a high-energy dog and would like outlets for her exuberance, you can teach her how to play fetch, play tug-of-war or participate in dog sports, such as agility, rally obedience, freestyle and flyball. If you’d like to impress your friends or just spend some quality time with your dog, you can take her to clicker training or trick-training classes. The possibilities are endless! Please see the following articles to find out more about what you and your dog can learn to do together: Teaching Your Dog Not to Jump Up on People, Teaching Your Dog to Come When Called, Teaching Your Dog Not to Pull on Leash, Teaching Your Dog to Play Tug-of-War, and Teaching Your Dog to Play Fetch.


If you’d like to learn how to train your dog or if your dog has a behavior problem you’d like to resolve, don’t hesitate get help from a qualified professional trainer or behaviorist. To learn more about locating the right expert for you and your dog, please see our article, Finding Professional Help. Many Certified Pet Dog Trainers (CPDTs) and Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists (CAABs or ACAABs) offer telephone consultations, in-home private consultations and training sessions, and group classes.
This collar from Educator is great for dog owners who want an alternative to a traditional shock collar. Rather than using a “sharp” static shock, it relies on “blunt” stimulation technology that has an effect that feels more like a strong tap. Educator describes this as less stressful for dogs, but just as effective for motivating them to comply. It also includes a Pavlovian Tone feature (named for the famed conditioning study), where dogs learn to respond to the sound before the stimulation rather than the stimulation itself. Puppy Training
When teaching new skills, keep training sessions short and sweet Like kids, dogs don’t have long attention spans. There’s no hard-and-fast rule, but an ideal average training session should last 15 minutes or less. Within that session, you can work on one skill or switch between a few different skills. To keep things interesting, try doing 5 to 15 repetitions of one behavior and then doing 5 to 15 repetitions of another behavior. You can also practice new skills and keep old ones polished by doing single repetitions at convenient times throughout the day. For example, before giving your dog a tasty new chew bone, ask her to sit or lie down to earn it.
If you run into trouble, go back a few steps If you’re training your dog to do something new and you stop making progress, you may have increased the difficulty of the skill too quickly. Similarly, if you’re practicing a behavior your dog hasn’t performed in a while and she seems a little rusty, she may need some help remembering what you want her to do. If you run into training challenges like these, just refresh your dog’s memory by making the skill a little easier for a few repetitions. Go back to a step that you know your dog can successfully perform, and practice that for a while before trying to increase difficulty again.
Depending on your schedule and your individual dog’s temperament, you may consider using a crate to aid you in potty training your pup. If you’re comfortable using a crate, it may help you keep a better eye on your dog, so you’re better able to recognize his signals that he needs to eliminate. A crate can also teach your pup that he needs to “hold it” until you open the crate and bring him outside.
3)      Find their Passion. What does your dog prize most?  Food? If so, what kind of food?  A toy—what toy?  A bone… well, you get the picture. Some dogs (like the above mentioned puppy-mill rescue) will do back flips for praise said in just the right tone.  Discover what your dog loves and give it to him after each successful potty run. For the first month, withhold that “thing” until after pottying.  Play or let him chew on it for 10 minutes, then set it aside for the next potty period.
In 2004, a study reviewed 5 other studies of feral dogs published between 1975 and 1995 and concluded that their pack structure is very loose and rarely involves any cooperative behavior, either in raising young or in obtaining food.[82] Feral dogs are primarily scavengers, with studies showing that unlike their wild cousins, they are poor ungulate hunters, having little effect on wildlife populations where they are sympatric.[83]:267 However, several garbage dumps located within the feral dog's home range are important for their survival.[84] Even well-fed domestic dogs are prone to scavenge; gastro-intestinal veterinary visits increase during warmer weather as dogs are prone to eat decaying material.[85] Some dogs consume feces, which may contain nutrition.[86][87] On occasion well-fed dogs have been known to scavenge their owners' corpses.[88]
The A+ TRAINERROOPZ Dog Training Collar with Remote features beep, vibration and shock discouragements and variable levels within each. With this, you’ll be able to control the intensity (with 7 different levels) to create stronger deterrents if your pup requires them and stick to the minimum if your pup just needs an occasional reminder. The long-lasting battery will keep you from constantly replacing and will allow you to train your pup without worrying about it dying during a critical training exercise.

Mop up any accidents with a paper towel and immediately bring a small piece of the soiled paper, along with your dog, to the potty place. Place the paper towel in the location you would have liked him to go potty and encourage him to sniff it while praising him. If you can, leave the soiled paper behind so that your dog can smell it again the next time you return. click here
Despite claims in the popular press, studies could not find evidence of a single predation on cattle by feral dogs.[38][80][81] However, domestic dogs were responsible for the death of 3 calves over one 5-year study.[81] Other studies in Europe and North America indicate only limited success in the consumption of wild boar, deer and other ungulates, however it could not be determined if this was predation or scavenging on carcasses. Studies have observed feral dogs conducting brief, uncoordinated chases of small game with constant barking - a technique without success.[38] Puppy potty Training
At Protection Dogs Worldwide, we offer residential obedience training for your canine companion. We understand that obedience training is time consuming, difficult and often a frustrating process for many owners. Protection Dogs Worldwide is able to remove much of the stress of training and use our knowledge and experience to train your dog to a high level of obedience. Our aim is turn your dog into a perfectly obedient companion, or provide a solid foundation for personal protection work. Puppy potty Training

Yes – with a warning. Most bark collars respond to a bark with a negative stimulus: citronella spray, ultrasonic sound, or a brief shock. The problem, and the warning, is for homes with multiple dogs or even dogs nearby. For this reason, many bark collars come with adjustable levels of sensitivity, making it harder to set off or easier, depending on your specific situation. You don’t want your dog getting negative reinforcement when another dog is misbehaving; of course because it’s cruel but also because it will confuse him and make the collar worthless. So use these collars carefully and never when he’s in the company of other untrained dogs. dog training classes
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