With your dog sitting at your side, set off and give the command “heel” (so that your dog is aware you are about to move). If the dog gets ahead, stop and encourage it back to your side with a titbit. Repeat. To begin with, stop every three to four paces to praise your dog and give a titbit. Do not use your voice unless your dog is at your side. You can also practise this off-lead in a secure area – this makes you work really hard at keeping your dog with you, rather than relying on the lead. click here
For dogs, English is a second language Dogs aren’t born understanding English. They can learn the significance of specific words, like “sit” and “walk” and “treat,” but when humans bury those familiar words in complex sentences, dogs sometimes have difficulty understanding. They can also get confused when people use different words for the same thing. For example, some people will confuse their dogs by saying, “Fluffy, down!” one day and “Sit down, Fluffy!” another day. Then they wonder why Fluffy doesn’t respond the same way every time. When teaching your dog a cue or command, decide on just one word or phrase, and make sure you and your family use it clearly and consistently.
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The A+ TRAINERROOPZ Dog Training Collar with Remote features beep, vibration and shock discouragements and variable levels within each. With this, you’ll be able to control the intensity (with 7 different levels) to create stronger deterrents if your pup requires them and stick to the minimum if your pup just needs an occasional reminder. The long-lasting battery will keep you from constantly replacing and will allow you to train your pup without worrying about it dying during a critical training exercise.
Separation anxiety is one of the most commonly discussed dog behavior problems. Manifestations include vocalization, chewing, inappropriate urination and defecation, and other forms of destruction that occur when a dog is separated from his owner. Not all of these actions are the result of separation anxiety. Signs of true separation anxiety include: dog training classes

The oldest form is a “shock” collar, but a lot has changed since then; they’re no longer painful and inhumane; even the Humane society supports its use (for modern collars, that is). There are other forms of stimulus that will deter dogs, too, though. You can try a collar that spurts an unpleasant smell (usually citronella as dog’s don’t care for that) when your dog is misbehaving. Other stimuli include loud sounds, ultra-sonic sounds, lights, and vibrations.
There are many methods to stop a dog's jumping, but not all will be successful. Lifting a knee, grabbing the paws, or pushing the dog away might work in some cases, but for most dogs, this sends the wrong message. Jumping up is often attention-seeking behavior, so any acknowledgment of your dog's actions provide an instant reward, reinforcing the jumping.

Waterproof. There are varying degrees of waterproof and you may opt not to get the 100% water proof version but we highly recommend having some water resistance for a dog training collar. There are simply too many actions dogs commonly take that accidentally get water on them. They could run in the rain before you get them in or they could splash through a mud puddle. Just the act of drinking their water could slop water up onto their collar without any real surprise to a pet parent. Take some precautions to prevent ruining the collar you choose. dog training tips
Dogs (and wolves) mark their territories with urine and their stools.[37] The anal gland of canines give a particular signature to fecal deposits and identifies the marker as well as the place where the dung is left. Dogs are very particular about these landmarks, and engage in what is to humans a meaningless and complex ritual before defecating. Most dogs start with a careful bout of sniffing of a location, perhaps to erect an exact line or boundary between their territory and another dog's territory. This behavior may also involve a small degree of elevation, such as a rock or fallen branch, to aid scent dispersal. Scratching the ground after defecating is a visual sign pointing to the scent marking. The freshness of the scent gives visitors some idea of the current status of a piece of territory and if it is used frequently. Regions under dispute, or used by different animals at different times, may lead to marking battles with every scent marked-over by a new competitor.[6]:252–4 Puppy potty Training
To get you started on the dos and don’ts, must haves and don’t wants we’ve organized a list to start you off right. We reviewed dozens of training collars for dogs to identify the best of the best. We looked at those with remotes and those without, along with those with and without an electric shock. We gathered our research and narrowed it down for you. click here
For dogs, English is a second language Dogs aren’t born understanding English. They can learn the significance of specific words, like “sit” and “walk” and “treat,” but when humans bury those familiar words in complex sentences, dogs sometimes have difficulty understanding. They can also get confused when people use different words for the same thing. For example, some people will confuse their dogs by saying, “Fluffy, down!” one day and “Sit down, Fluffy!” another day. Then they wonder why Fluffy doesn’t respond the same way every time. When teaching your dog a cue or command, decide on just one word or phrase, and make sure you and your family use it clearly and consistently. more on this

Hands up is a fantastic trick that looks great. The dog is taught to sit back and hold both front paws up simultaneously. Easy to reinforce by offering the word hands up and a treat each time the dog manages to get both front paws off the ground. The pure position of this trick makes it look like it was really difficult to teach but if you reward with good timing early on then the dog will perfect his position with little effort from you.
Just as a growing child, your dog will want to chew on toys and other objects to relieve the pain of a new set of teeth coming in. If your dog is full grown, you may also come home to find your couch cushions or favorite pair of shoes ripped to shreds, but it is not because they enjoy the taste. Your dog could be exhibiting signs of separation anxiety or anxiety in general. See 5 steps to correct inappropriate dog chewing.
Training a dog to speak is fun and it helps to solve a common behavior problem. Many dog trainers recommend using the 'speak' and 'quiet' commands to put an end to excessive barking. Putting these on command allows your dog to bark in certain situations, and also allows you to have control over when the barking should start and stop. It's also a lot of fun to show off your dog's conversational skills at family gatherings!

In the UK between 2005 and 2013, there were 17 fatal dog attacks. In 2007–08, there were 4,611 hospital admissions due to dog attacks, which increased to 5,221 in 2008–09. It was estimated in 2013 that more than 200,000 people a year are bitten by dogs in England, with the annual cost to the National Health Service of treating injuries about £3 million.[97] A report published in 2014 stated there were 6,743 hospital admissions specifically caused by dog bites, a 5.8% increase from the 6,372 admissions in the previous 12 months.[98]
Positive reinforcement is the key to success. A common mistake is to punish your dog during training or become angry. This will only cause confusion. You can try to hold your dog's attention with treats and enthusiasm, but know that it is time to end a session when your dog becomes bored or tired. Try to end sessions on a positive note. Eventually, successful training will be achieved with patience and consistency.

The “shock factor” of many training collars doesn't appeal to everyone. That’s understandable—and there are other options for pet owners who want to promote better behavior, but are worried about causing their dog pain. This collar from Wolfwill exclusively uses tones and vibration to give your dog feedback and is still highly effective. The vibration feature has 16 levels of intensity, and the collar works at a range of up to 660 yards. The transmitter is designed with touch-distinguished buttons made with blind users in mind, but the product isn’t specific to owners of seeing-eye dogs. dog training collar
DogOwner is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Additionally, WonderfulWellies participates in various other affiliate programs, and we sometimes get a commission through purchases made through our links. Puppy potty Training

You should always accompany your puppy outside for potty breaks. You’re there not only to ensure that he actually goes, you’re also there to reward your puppy with a treat for going in the proper spot. Wait until your puppy finishes eliminating and immediately give him a tasty reward for a job well done. If you wait until you get back in the house, your puppy won’t make the connection between his elimination and the reward.
Consequences must be immediate Dogs live in the present. Unlike us, they can’t make connections between events and experiences that are separated in time. For your dog to connect something she does with the consequences of that behavior, the consequences must be immediate. If you want to discourage your dog from doing something, you have to catch her with her paw in the proverbial cookie jar. For example, if your dog gets too rough during play and mouths your arm, try saying “OUCH!” right at the moment you feel her teeth touch your skin. Then abruptly end playtime. The message is immediate and clear: Mouthing on people results in no more fun. Rewards for good behavior must come right after that behavior has happened, too. Say a child in a classroom answers a teacher’s question correctly, gets up from his desk, sharpens his pencil and then punches another kid in the arm on the way back to his seat. Then the teacher says, “Good job, Billy!” and offers him a piece of candy. What did Billy get the candy for? Timing is crucial. So be prepared to reward your dog with treats, praise, petting and play the instant she does something you like. go here for more

Positive reinforcement is the key to success. A common mistake is to punish your dog during training or become angry. This will only cause confusion. You can try to hold your dog's attention with treats and enthusiasm, but know that it is time to end a session when your dog becomes bored or tired. Try to end sessions on a positive note. Eventually, successful training will be achieved with patience and consistency. click here
Consideration: Many little dogs generally don’t like to rock the boat. This is especially true if they’ve been punished for accidents. A lot of people think punishing works because their dog or pup looks guilty. Well, that guilty look is just fear. And it doesn’t work; why else would you be reading this article? Often a little dog will make it easy on everyone and potty in a remote corner of the house. Think back: was there a time your puppy nipped, barked, or jumped at you repeatedly? Don’t ignore it—that’s the doggy equivalent of a toddler’s crotch grasping or body squirm. Our dog will nip, jump, and bark at you to tell you he’s gotta go!

If you run into trouble, go back a few steps If you’re training your dog to do something new and you stop making progress, you may have increased the difficulty of the skill too quickly. Similarly, if you’re practicing a behavior your dog hasn’t performed in a while and she seems a little rusty, she may need some help remembering what you want her to do. If you run into training challenges like these, just refresh your dog’s memory by making the skill a little easier for a few repetitions. Go back to a step that you know your dog can successfully perform, and practice that for a while before trying to increase difficulty again.


Often, the sit command will be one of the easiest for your dog to learn first. Next, you can train your dog to lie down. At the same time, work on teaching your dog to stay. In addition, your dog should be trained to come when called as soon as possible. This is one of the most important fundamental commands. Once your dog has mastered these dog obedience basics, you can move on to fun tricks and advanced commands.
The lightest of SportDog’s training collars, the Field Trainer 425X works well for hunting enthusiasts who want to teach their dogs to improve their flushing and retrieving skills. It’s waterproof and has a range of 500 yards, with batteries that last 50-70 hours per charge—making it perfect for long days on the range, no matter the weather or terrain. The transmitter can also control up to three collars, so you can work with multiple dogs at once.
To get you started on the dos and don’ts, must haves and don’t wants we’ve organized a list to start you off right. We reviewed dozens of training collars for dogs to identify the best of the best. We looked at those with remotes and those without, along with those with and without an electric shock. We gathered our research and narrowed it down for you. click here
Despite claims in the popular press, studies could not find evidence of a single predation on cattle by feral dogs.[38][80][81] However, domestic dogs were responsible for the death of 3 calves over one 5-year study.[81] Other studies in Europe and North America indicate only limited success in the consumption of wild boar, deer and other ungulates, however it could not be determined if this was predation or scavenging on carcasses. Studies have observed feral dogs conducting brief, uncoordinated chases of small game with constant barking - a technique without success.[38]
The process is the exactly same for older dogs as it is for puppies; prevent accidents from happening by using baby gates and a crate if possible, create a predictable schedule, learn to recognize your dog’s potty signals, accompany your dog outside and immediately reward for all outdoor elimination, properly clean any accidents and supervise your dog until you’re sure that he understands the rules.
^ De Meester, R. H.; De Bacquer, D.; Peremans, K.; Vermeire, S.; Planta, D. J.; Coopman, F.; Audenaert, K. (2008). "A preliminary study on the use of the Socially Acceptable Behavior test as a test for shyness/confidence in the temperament of dogs". Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research. 3 (4): 161–170. doi:10.1016/j.jveb.2007.10.005. click here
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